Netflix’s Password Sharing Crackdown Could Cost You

If you’re sharing a Netflix password among friends and family, your free ride may be coming to an end soon.

Netflix has announced that it will be cracking down on password sharing outside the household — aka with your extended family and friends. For now, Netflix says it is testing the rollout in Chile, Costa Rica and Peru “before making changes anywhere else in the world.”

Adding an extra member to an account will now cost an extra $3 a month in those three countries.

Alternatively, subscribers can transfer current profiles to an entirely new account and retain viewing history, watchlists and personalized recommendations — but that requires paying for an additional account. The extra member feature is only available with a standard or premium account.

The digital streaming service, known for hit shows such as “Stranger Things,” “Squid Games,” and “The Crown,” stated in its press release that there is “some confusion about when and how Netflix can be shared.” We don’t know how much of Netflix’s password sharing problem is due to “confusion” rather than an attempt to be thrifty, but the company appears determined to do something about it.

With Netflix prices already rising in the U.S. — prices increased in January to $9.99/month for a basic account, $15.49/month for a standard account, and $19.99/month for a premium account — the extra fees may be too much for subscribers.

If you’re struggling to keep up with the cost of streaming services, check out our guide to the best free TV apps. If you’re ready to pull the plug on Netflix, you can do so by visiting Netflix’s support page for cancellations.

Michael Archambault is a Senior Writer with The Penny Hoarder specializing in technology.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.